Posts Tagged ‘nexus5’

Nexus 5 exit review

Sunday, March 11th, 2018

Or, it is not a good idea to make a thing you’re likely to drop out of glass.

In 2015, I wrote a review after ten months of using the Nexus 5. As I wrote then, I had bought the Nexus 5 based on wireless networks supported, size, software hackability, input methods, software updates, storage size/options, and the camera in roughly that order; it was the most expensive phone I had bought to date, after I previously bought both my Blackberry Pearl 8100 and my Nexus One lightly used.

The big reason for writing the review in 2015 was my reaction to breaking the glass over the Nexus 5 screen. I continued to use the phone; a few more drops broke the glass on top left of the device but didn’t impact the screen greatly. In December 2016, I dropped it one last time trying to check directions while cycling. This time the liquid crystals in top left broke, and the touchscreen stopped responding. That does mean that the phone ultimately survived two years with cracked and weakened top glass, so that’s something.

After two and a half years, I still agree with most of my ten-month review: it did look nice; the screen was nice; reliability and durability of the all-glass front is not good. Size is too big for single-handed use and not suited for use on the go. The enclosed, non-field-replaceable battery didn’t end up being a problem in the end. I really liked wireless charging with Qi. I hardly ever used NFC.

It wasn’t critical, but I would have liked a bit more storage space, or upgradeable storage space. The camera was workable and automatic panorama stitching was neat. The keyboard was alright when using two-hands, not suitable for single-handed use, and not suitable for typing without looking down at the keyboard. It’s still silly to think that a phone has 2 GB of RAM.

By the way, when sitting idle with the screen off, a two-year-old Nexus 5 has a battery life of about a week.

Some changes from the older review: I have ran into some really annoying edge cases with MTP mounting and am wishing for direct USB mass storage mounting to make a return. The soft-touch finish has aged better than I thought it would, which makes the fragile glass front all the more annoying. The missing stickers from within the “Nexus” cut-out logo on the back are not a huge problem visually, though I still think they could have been omitted in the first place.

I wonder how much more durable the phone would have been if the plastic casing extended into the front face a tiny bit, instead of the front being edge-to-edge glass. The screen cracks propagated from the edges inwards, and I noticed my old Nexus One had many scratches on its front corners that didn’t impact the glass.

One other issue I have noticed is hairline cracks in side bezels around the SIM card slot on the right hand side, and around the volume rocker on the left hand side. These look like stress from falls and bumps breaking the thin side pieces at their narrowest.

Ultimately, two and a half years of use is shorter than I’d like, but I guess not terrible. It would probably feel a bit more acceptable if this was a $200 purchase, not a $400 one.

Perhaps my foremost problem was that I wanted the Nexus 5 to be a phone: a device to use single-handed, on the go, designed to account for the reality that it will sometimes be dropped. The Nexus 5 is not that kind of phone.

When a phone is not a phone

Monday, June 5th, 2017

A brief taxonomy of mobile computing devices.

I have been writing a post about my Nexus 5 phone and came across a theory: the Nexus 5 is not, in fact, a phone.

I suggest that modern mobile computers that are between smartwatches and tablets in size can be roughly split into two categories:

  1. “Phone” – use mainly for text and voice, single-handed, will be dropped, will be used on the go
  2. “Mobile device” – two-handed, used in safe locations, seated or at least securely standing

Size impacts how you use a device. It is difficult to use a device bigger than early smartphones one-handed. The situation isn’t helped by slippery surfaces like glass or metal on both sides of many new phones. If you regularly attempt to pull a large smartphone out of a pocket while walking or cycling, you’ll drop it eventually.

And while phones were designed to be dropped with minimum damage – compact shape, non-structural outer body, rounded plastic corners that take in most of the crash energy, even battery covers that pop off – modern devices might as well be designed to take maximum damage when dropped, with rigid materials throughout and functional edge-to-edge glass on a large front face.

Fragile smartphones that don’t take being dropped well have been a problem for almost a decade now and there’s little to indicate that the situation is getting better. Workarounds include protective or grippy cases, but I would much rather just have a phone that doesn’t need a case in the first place. I understand their value for specialized needs or carrying methods – for couriers or sport – but I just want to send short text messages and check next bus time a couple of times a day.

Here is a small selection of phones and mobile devices released over the past two decades:

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Rescuing data from an Android phone with broken touchscreen and disabled USB debugging

Friday, December 16th, 2016

Last week I dropped my Nexus 5 once again, this time for good. I had cracked and broken the top glass before, but the display and the touchscreen kept on working. This time, the touchscreen no longer registers touches, though luckily the display still works somewhat. On a device with no trackball, touchpad, or keyboard, a broken touchscreen is problematic.

Unfortunately, I had been lazy about keeping my phone properly backed up. There wasn’t that much unique stuff on it, but I always meant to backup apps and app data, and to eventually root and reflash someday — but never got around to it. Consequently I didn’t have USB debugging turned on, or a computer cleared for debugging.

Generally, the way to control and back up Android devices is from your desktop computer, using a USB connection and software called adb (Android Debug Bridge, see adb docs). However, USB debugging must be first turned on in Android settings, and since Android 4.2.2, the phone asks to confirm debugging access from each computer that attempts to connect. Normally the confirmation is done using the phone touchscreen. Oops.

Here are my notes on what I did to eventually gain USB debugging access. I did not require root or fastboot. I needed a computer to act as the adb host and a few accessories: a USB OTG cable, a USB mouse, and a Bluetooth keyboard.

Learning from my trouble, I recommend people running Android 4.4.3 or higher and interested in maintaining access to their device to enable USB debugging ahead of time.

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Nexus 5, ten months in

Monday, February 23rd, 2015

I like bunnie’s exit review idea (e.g. on his T60p, on his 8700c): the thought that you can write a better review at the end of a device’s life than after a week or two. This is not a true exit review, but I will bend the rules here a bit and say that ten months, one winter, and one broken screen is enough to write down some useful thoughts about the Nexus 5.

I bought a Nexus 5 in April 2014. This is my third mobile phone after a Blackberry Pearl 8100 and an HTC Nexus One. I’ve also owned Nokia’s N800 and N810 internet tablet devices.

Factors involved in deciding what phone to get were wireless networks supported, size, software hackability, input methods, software updates, storage size/options, and the camera in roughly that order.

I somewhat seriously considered going back to Blackberry but couldn’t find a pentaband model I liked and could justify cost-wise. I briefly tried a Nokia E72 but found software and keyboard lacking. At one point I considered a Nokia E6 but ended up forgetting it (oops) when I resumed phone-shopping.

I paid $132.50 (USD) for the Blackberry in September 2008, $200 for the Nexus One in October 2011, and ended up paying $463.62 for the black 32 GB Nexus 5 in April 2014. My thoughts are mixed.

Blackberry Pearl 8100, HTC Nexus One, and LG Nexus 5 phones viewed from the front

The family, with factory screen protector still on the N5.

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